I'm lurky, beardy, wordy, and many other things that often times don't end with a 'y.' I have a full time job of making an idiot out of myself. Don't worry, I have my Master's degree.

22nd July 2014

Photo reblogged from not such a clever girl with 313,898 notes

lizawithazed:

sometimes you see a pun so artfully constructed you just have to stand back in awe.

lizawithazed:

sometimes you see a pun so artfully constructed you just have to stand back in awe.

Source: iraffiruse

17th July 2014

Photoset reblogged from Follow me into the sea⚓ with 224,445 notes

tristyntothesea:

angrybabysitter:

tofumotherfucker:

This is rape culture

Why are guys so scared of murder? Y’all should feel pride that I risked my life in jail just to fUCKING KILL YOU YOU FUKCING DOUCHEBAGS

"But not all men are like thaaaattttt!!! I’d never dooo thaaatttt!!! You’re so mad over nothing, just calm downnnn!!1!!!!!1111!!!!!"

i just threw up all over the world

wow.

Source: amy-beee

17th July 2014

Question reblogged from The Frogman with 25,429 notes

Anonymous said: Towards the whole "pronouns hurt people's feelings" topic. Am I REALLY the only person on the planet that thinks people are becoming far to sensative? Nearly to the point that they shouldn't leave their little home bubbles in the case that a bird chirps next to them in a way that sounds like a mean word. Maybe, JUST MAYBE, we're becoming a little TOO coddling and people need to learn to deal with simplistic shit like words. And yes, I've been insulted and made fun of. I got over it. So can you.

thefrogman:

Supposedly invented by the Chinese, there is an ancient form of torture that is nothing more than cold, tiny drops falling upon a person’s forehead. 

On its own, a single drop is nothing. It falls upon the brow making a tiny splash. It doesn’t hurt. No real harm comes from it. 

In multitudes, the drops are still fairly harmless. Other than a damp forehead, there really is no cause for concern. 

The key to the torture is being restrained. You cannot move. You must feel each drop. You have lost all control over stopping these drops of water from splashing on your forehead. 

It still doesn’t seem like that big of a deal. But person after person, time and time again—would completely unravel psychologically. They all had a breaking point where each drop turned into a horror. Building and building until all sense of sanity was completely lost. 

"It was just a joke, quite being so sensitive."

"They used the wrong pronoun, big deal."

"So your parents don’t understand, it could be worse."

Day after day. Drop after drop. It builds up. A single instance on its own is no big deal. A few drops, not a problem. But when you are restrained, when you cannot escape the drops, when it is unending—these drops can be agony. 

People aren’t sensitive because they can’t take a joke. Because they can’t take being misgendered one time. Because they lack a thick skin. 

People are sensitive because the drops are unending and they have no escape from them. 

You are only seeing the tiny, harmless, single drop hitting these so-called “sensitive” people. You are failing to see the thousands of drops endured before that. You are failing to see the restraints that make them inescapable.

16th July 2014

Photo reblogged from Random Ghost with 500 notes

Source: scifiarchive

11th July 2014

Photoset reblogged from Ashe Maree with 2,129 notes

babeobaggins:

I happy wit blue

Source: babeobaggins

8th July 2014

Photo reblogged from Let the STORMRAGE on! with 111,776 notes

stunningpicture:

Was taking random pictures of my mother and this came out…pretty terrifying

stunningpicture:

Was taking random pictures of my mother and this came out…pretty terrifying

Source: stunningpicture

7th July 2014

Photoset reblogged from Apparently Fish Need Bicycles. with 133,535 notes

tamorapierce:

aliasofwestgate:

justira:

Reblogging not just because special effects are cool but because body doubles, stunt doubles, acting doubles, talent doubles — all the people whose faces we’re not supposed to see but whose bodies make movies and tv shows possible — these people need and deserve more recognition. We see their bodies onscreen, delight in the shape and motion of those bodies, but even as we pick apart everything else that goes on both on and behind the screen, I just don’t see the people who are those bodies getting the love and recognition they deserve.

We’re coming to love and recognize actors who work in full-body makeup/costumes, such as Andy Serkis, or actors whose entire performances, or large chunks thereof, are motion captured or digitized (lately sometimes also Andy Serkis!). But people like Leander Deeny play an enormous part in making characters such as Steve Rogers come to life, too. Body language is a huge part of a performance and of characterization. For characters/series with a lot of action, a stunt person can have a huge influence on how we read and interpret a character, such as the influence Heidi Moneymaker has had on the style and choreography of Black Widow’s signature fighting style. Talent doubles breathe believability and discipline-specific nuance into demanding storylines.

Actors are creative people themselves, and incredibly important in building the characters we see onscreen. But if we agree that they’re more than dancing monkeys who just do whatever the directors/writers say, then we have to agree that doubles are more than that, too. Doubles make creative decisions too, and often form strong, mutually supportive relationship with actors.

image image

Image 1: “I would like to thank Kathryn Alexandre, the most generous actor I’ve ever worked opposite.”

Image 2: “Kathryn who’s playing my double who’s incredible.”

[ Orphan Black's Tatiana Maslany on her acting double, Kathryn Alexandre, two images from a set on themarysue, via lifeofkj ]

image image

image image

I’ve got a relationship that goes back many, many years with Dave. And I would hate for people to just see that image of me and Dave and go, “oh, there’s Dan Radcliffe with a person in a wheelchair.” Because I would never even for a moment want them to assume that Dave was anything except for an incredibly important person in my life.

[ Daniel Radcliffe talking about David Holmes, his stunt double for 2001-2009, who was paralysed while working on the Harry Potter films. David Holmes relates his story here. Gifset via smeagoled ]

With modern tv- and film-making techniques, many characters are composite creations. The characters we see onscreen or onstage have always been team efforts, with writers, directors, makeup artists, costume designers, special effects artists, production designers, and many other people all contributing to how a character is ultimately realized in front of us. Many different techniques go into something like the creation of Skinny Steve — he’s no more all Leander Deeny than he is all Chris Evans.

But as fandom dissects the anatomy of scenes in ever-increasing detail to get at microexpressions and the minutiae of body language, let’s recognize the anatomy in the scenes, too. I don’t mean to take away from the work Chris Evans or any other actors do (he is an amazing Steve Rogers and I love him tons), but fandom needs to do better in recognizing the bodies, the other people, who make up the characters we love and some of our very favourite shots of them. Chris Evans has an amazing body, but so does Leander Deeny — that body is beautiful; that body mimicked Chris Evans’s motions with amazing, skilled precision; that body moved Steve Rogers with emotion and grace and character.

Fandom should do better than productions and creators who fail to be transparent about the doubles in their productions. On the screen, suspension of disbelief is key and the goal is to make all the effort that went into the production vanish and leave only the product itself behind. But when the film is over and the episode ends, let’s remember everyone who helped make that happen.

image

[ Sam Hargrave (stunt double for Chris Evans) and James Young (stunt double for Sebastian Stan, and fight choreographer), seen from behind, exchange a fistbump while in costume on the set of Captain America: The Winter Soldier. Image via lifeofkj ]

I applaud these guys as much as the suit actors in my japanese tokusatsu shows. They do just as much work. 

Hat’s off to them, and my thanks for all they do.

Source: stark-industries-rnd

7th July 2014

Photo reblogged from Feather Not Dot with 9,063 notes

Source: rhamphotheca

7th July 2014

Photo reblogged from kissed by fire with 13,515 notes

betwen-iron-and-silver:

"Do you know what’s funny? Sometimes I’ll see photographs of myself in the early days of The X-Files and I think that my attitude towards the whole thing was very similar to Kristen Stewart’s,"
 “There’s a very similar look in my eye; slightly defiant, slightly bored. All I ever got was: ‘Smile! Smile!’ when I didn’t want to smile. And I really wish that somebody at that time had told me: ‘You know that it’s OK to be who you really are’.” Gillian Anderson on Kristen Stewart

betwen-iron-and-silver:

"Do you know what’s funny? Sometimes I’ll see photographs of myself in the early days of The X-Files and I think that my attitude towards the whole thing was very similar to Kristen Stewart’s,"


“There’s a very similar look in my eye; slightly defiant, slightly bored. All I ever got was: ‘Smile! Smile!’ when I didn’t want to smile. And I really wish that somebody at that time had told me: ‘You know that it’s OK to be who you really are’.”

Gillian Anderson on Kristen Stewart

Source: betwen-iron-and-silver

7th July 2014

Photo reblogged from Seanweif with 14,224 notes

qvantvm-flvx:

http://qvantvm-flvx.tumblr.com/

qvantvm-flvx:

http://qvantvm-flvx.tumblr.com/