I'm lurky, beardy, wordy, and many other things that often times don't end with a 'y.' I have a full time job of making an idiot out of myself. Don't worry, I have my Master's degree.

24th April 2014

Link reblogged from WIL WHEATON dot TUMBLR with 2,396 notes

"Fangirl" is not an insult. →

“I like fangirls how I like my coffee. I hate coffee.” Three days after being spotted on a T-shrt for sale at WonderCon, this idiotic slogan is still making waves in the geek community.

Why? Well, for one thing, it seems like a perfect example of the hostile environment women have to deal with when they attend conventions. However, the T-shirt’s manufacturer, Tankhead Custom Tees, has just come forward to explain why the shirt isn’t sexist.

“the fangirl/fanboy shirts can best be explained like this: fangirls/boys =/= fans. Fans are people who like and genuinely respect a fandom, and it’s creators. Fangirls/boys are like those creepy fedora wearing neckbearded bronies, or hetalia fanfiction shippers, who make us all collectively cringe in pain at what they do to the things we love.

No one should ever defend these kinds of people. Seriously, they make the rest of us look bad.”

So, just to be clear here, the shirt isn’t insulting toward all women, just the ones who are the wrong kind of fan. And that’s totally not a gendered insult because bronies (i.e. male fans of a media source that’s traditionally aimed at girls) are repulsive as well. Right?

The idea that it’s OK to be disgusted by certain types of fan is pretty widespread in geek culture, and it’s ridiculous to suggest that this habit isn’t connected to sexist prejudice. In the nonsensical social strata of geekdom, “serious” sci-fi literature fans are somewhere at the top, Trekkies and comic book nerds are somewhere around the middle, and anything women are interested in is invariably right down at the bottom. Popular examples: Supernatural, YA novels with female protagonists, fanfiction, shoujo anime, and pretty much anything that’s popular on Tumblr.

It’s no coincidence that “fangirl” is most commonly used to describe women who read and write fanfiction. By the logic of people who use fangirl as a pejorative term, fans who spend hours reading and collecting superhero comics are at the cool, respectable end of the geek scale, while “fangirls”  who write tens of thousands of words of superhero fanfic are embarrassing weirdos. In other words, if you conform to the old-fashioned, male-dominated form of fandom then you’re fine, but if you prefer to join the subculture that was primarily founded on the work of female fans, then it’s acceptable to publicly mock you at an event like WonderCon.

[READ MORE]

Source: hellotailor

22nd April 2014

Post reblogged from kissed by fire with 4,675 notes

Why David Benioff and D.B. Weiss raped Cersei Lannister

thusspakekate:

Much has already been written about Sunday’s controversial episode of Game of Thrones. The episode itself was actually rather dull—a lot of exposition and little action—but one particular scene has already garnered thousands of keystrokes, hundreds of outraged tweets, and dozens of confused attempts at rationalization. Viewers will no doubt know exactly what scene I mean.

In the Great Sept, next to the dead body of their first born son, Jaime Lannister rapes his sister, the mother of his three children.

 Immediately after this scene aired, fans were at their keyboards crying foul. Jaime Lannister would never! That’s not how it happened in the book! How could they?

I had waited anxiously for that scene. In the books, it was the first time Jaime and Cersei were reunited since he went off to war. It was an emotional, passionate, and bloody (period sex, fuck yeah) reunion. I assumed it wouldn’t happen since Jaime returned early on the show’s timeline and their reunion was less than enthusiastic. I was wary when they revealed that Jaime has been back for two weeks on the show’s timeline and they still hadn’t had sex. In the books, they were fucking within a matter of minutes.

“Hurry,” she was whispering now, “quickly, quickly, now, do it now, do me now. JaimeJaime Jaime.” Her hands helped guide him.“Yes,” Cersei said as he thrust, “my brother, sweet brother, yes, like that, yes, I have you, you’re home now, you’re home now, you’re home.” She kissed his ear and stroked his short bristly hair. Jaime lost himself in her flesh. He could feel Cersei’s heart beating in time with his own, and the wetness of blood and seed where they were joined.

Imagine my surprise when Jaime shows up to visit Cersei in the Sept then. Excitement stole through me. They were going to be true to the story after all. This would be their reconciliation, their grief would bring them together. They would fuck on the altar of their dead son as he lies in state, and then Jaime would try to convince her to run away with him, to live as husband and wife, to replace their murdered son with new, trueborn children, just as he had in the books.

Instead, he rapes her. Instead of guiding him inside her, she is forced onto the ground and begs him to stop. Instead of futility trying to convince her to join him in a folie à deux where they can have their happily ever after, he calls her hateful. He growls that the gods have made him love a hateful woman. And then he rapes her.

Immediately fans pointed out how completely out of character this was for him. Jaime loves Cersei. Jaime has devoted his entire life to caring for her, to protecting her, to enabling her every whim. Not only that, he is decidedly not a rapist. In a country where rape and murder are so common they’re expected, Jaime Lannister stands out as a man who actually…doesn’t do it. Just the season before, he shields Brienne of Tarth from the grisly fate when they’re captured by Vargo Hoat’s men. He doesn’t rape, he doesn’t whore, he doesn’t even sleep around. He is utterly devoted to his sister-lover.

So why does he do it on the show? Better yet, why do D&D have him do it when it seems to go against all of the careful and painful character development he received in the last season? How does Jaime go from protecting Brienne of Tarth from gang rape and jumping into a pit to save her from a bear, to raping the woman he has devoted the last forty years of his life to?

As many fans pointed out: Just what happened to that inspirational redemption arc of his? How could they possibly think this was in character?

I think the key to this mystery is in the dialogue:

"You are a hateful woman. Why have the gods made me love such a hateful woman?" 

The rape scene is tangential to Jaime’s “redemption arc” in that it is Cersei’s punishment for making him need redemption in the first place.

We know how hard Jaime’s had it, how everyone mocks and hates him for the impossible choice he made when he earned his nickname, Kingslayer. We know he’d given up being honorable because no one saw him as honorable. And, because of his relationship with Brienne, we know that, deep down, under the gold cloak and the shiny hair and attempted murder of a child. All he ever wanted to be was a knight like Ser Arthur Dayne, the Sword of the He’s really just a noble guy whose been lead astray.

And whose fault is that?

David Beniodd and D.B. Weiss say it’s Cersei’s fault. Not explicitly. At least, not yet. But that’s why the sex scene in the Sept became the rape scene in the sept. That’s why, despite hundreds of pages of painstaking character development that make it entirely illogical for that to happen, they wrote it that way for television. 

Because on the King’s Road with Brienne, Jaime was beginning to get in touch with the boy-knight still inside himself, the one who still believed in the words he said. Her honor made him want to be more honorable too. But now he’s back in King’s Landing, outside of Brienne’s sphere of good influence and back in Cersei’s corrupting one. Instead of welcoming Jaime home with open legs, D&D’s Cersei is standoffish and unresponsive.

He stands in the previous episode, pathetically pleading for a modicum of her affection, but she spurns him, telling him he’s too late, that things have changed. D&D’s Cersei cares not a whit for Jaime, though he has devoted his whole life to her, has allowed her to mold him into the man who stands before her. And what better way to show how corrupting she is, than to have that love turned against her?

The show uses rape as Cersei’s comeuppance, her poetic justice for tainting the honorable Jaime’s good honor. That’s why the show’s writers didn’t see it as an out of character action, because Jaime isn’t Jaime when he’s with Cersei, he’s just some pitiful victim of her machinations. When he assaults her, she’s only reaping what she sowed.

I don’t think I have to explain why this is a fucked up, misogynistic, and ethically wrong narrative choice, do I?

The god’s may have made Jaime love a hateful woman, but D&D were the ones who made him rape her. 

Source: thusspakekate

22nd April 2014

Link reblogged from WIL WHEATON dot TUMBLR with 8,535 notes

Contents Under Pressure →

iamuhura:

ruckawriter:

I rarely use this to just blog. I’m going to just blog now, so you can all just ignore this if it’s not to your liking.

Warning. Contents under pressure.

Read More

Wow. Greg Rucka is super for reals not here for your sexist bullshit in nerd or geek…

Source: ruckawriter

17th April 2014

Post reblogged from Feminist Roosterteeth with 19,146 notes

officialheinzdoofenshmirtz:

behold, it is i, the evil social justice warrior, here to ruin your fun by pointing out that you’re being kind of an asshole

Source: officialheinzdoofenshmirtz

17th April 2014

Quote reblogged from Feather Not Dot with 10,604 notes

Bad books on writing tell you to ‘WRITE WHAT YOU KNOW’, a solemn and totally false adage that is the reason there exist so many mediocre novels about English professors contemplating adultery.
— Joe Haldeman (via maxkirin)

Source: maxkirin

16th April 2014

Photo reblogged from Ashe Maree with 11,613 notes

Source: masterofmalpka

16th April 2014

Link reblogged from Another Way To Breathe with 1,049 notes

Comics, I kind of hate you right now →

gimpnelly:

wonderali:

I haven’t read comics in about two months now. Aside from a few general pieces here and there, I haven’t written about comics in about a year. There are some things about the comics community that are pretty ugly. And those things are getting in the way of my…

Source: wonderali

16th April 2014

Quote reblogged from Whedonesque with 262 notes

I believe the subtext here is rapidly becoming text.
— Giles (via whedonesque)

16th April 2014

Photoset reblogged from Alexis Ren with 5,969 notes

rawkiss:

wow i love this

Source: itsalwaysourselveswefindinthesea

16th April 2014

Video reblogged from the world is really fricked the heck up with 30,062 notes

rufftoon:

sircuddlebuns:

Skip the Use - Nameless World

I AM SO IN LOVE WITH THIS! THE SONG AND THE ANIMATION ARE SO GOOD I AM HAVING AN OUT OF BODY EXPERIENCE PLEASE WATCH THIS YOU WILL NOT BE SORRY

Reblogging, because this is a better quality version than the last link I had.

Once again, music video set into the world of Zombillenium, by Arthur De Pins. The book should be turned into an animated feature film.

Source: sircuddlebuns